Finding the ideal version of success with Mark Asquith - Success Inspired

Episode 54

Finding the ideal version of success with Mark Asquith

In this episode I interview Mark Asquith about about his Entrepreneurial journey, his idea of success and running SaaS company. 

Mark a serial entrepreneur who has built several globally successful businesses since he quit his real job in 2005. Billed as the U.K. podcast expert, Mark is CEO & co-founder of Rebel Base Media, a podcast tech and strategy company that owns Captivate.fm, Poductivity, Podcast Websites, Podcast Success Academy & Rebel Base Studios and is well known as an insightful, thought-provoking and actionable podcast industry keynote speaker.

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Highlights:

  • (00:00:16) - Introduction - who is Mark Asquith?
  • (00:02:02) - What does success mean to Mark?
  • (00:14:28) - Having more freedom by design, pursue of control first money second
  • (00:20:12) - Business ownership or career with flexibility, both great options. 
  • (00:23:20) - About the so called excited, young & hyped up entrepreneurs
  • (00:24:20) - Litmus test to help you find a true guru / coach
  • (00:29:12) - Going all in - what to watch out for
  • (00:35:46) - Have a safety net when starting a new business to avoid going bananas
  • (00:41:34) - Perception of success vs real success, are you in for you or your ego?
  • (00:53:04) - Final advice from Mark
  • (00:55:08) - Special offer - get 7 Day Free Trial on Captivate

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Transcript
Speaker:

Welcome to the Success Inspired Podcast, a business and personal development podcast to help you accomplish more in life and realize your true potential.

Speaker:

And now here is your host Vit Muller

Vit Muller:

Welcome to another episode of the Success Inspired Podcast my guest today, I'm super excited to have this guest on today, he's a serial entrepreneur who has built

Vit Muller:

We'll get to that later on in the podcast, they also run a PODuctivity which is, helping those of you who have Podcasts to have actual custom websites.

Vit Muller:

They've got Podcast Success Academy and Rebel Base Studios, which is well known as an insightful thought provoking and actionable podcast.

Vit Muller:

He's a wildly approachable Britt, he is a star Wars, DC comics geek for those who love that stuff.

Vit Muller:

And we check him out and that he believes that good business starts with being good to people.

Vit Muller:

Um, so please welcome to the show.

Vit Muller:

Mark Asquith.

Mark Asquith:

Hello mate.

Mark Asquith:

How are you doing?

Mark Asquith:

I think you said it best perfectly, don't you worry

Vit Muller:

right.

Vit Muller:

To have you on the show credits in the show.

Vit Muller:

I was practicing your surname Asquith, correct?

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Most people get that.

Mark Asquith:

I've had all sorts with that one.

Mark Asquith:

I always try and tell people if they're wondering how to pronounce it.

Mark Asquith:

just think of ass & quiff, you know, top to bottom.

Mark Asquith:

Nice and easy.

Mark Asquith:

And people just nail it after that one.

Mark Asquith:

yeah, just eat.

Mark Asquith:

See, there you go.

Mark Asquith:

Straight off the bat.

Mark Asquith:

So yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Well, thanks for having me, man.

Mark Asquith:

It's a pleasure to be here.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah,

Vit Muller:

it is.

Vit Muller:

I'm glad we finally made it happen.

Vit Muller:

I know we had to juggle a few times, but you know, we made it eventually.

Vit Muller:

It just good.

Vit Muller:

so let's, let's let's get it.

Vit Muller:

Let's get this party started.

Vit Muller:

What does success mean to you, Mark?

Mark Asquith:

success.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, success.

Mark Asquith:

I think to me just means being able to do what I want when I want to do it.

Mark Asquith:

And that sounds very selfish, but that, you know, I think that the, the, what you want to do changes with with your age, you know, when you're much younger,

Mark Asquith:

And as you get older, you want to do stuff a little bit more for the people, for your family, for your kids, for your, for your partners and, and your family.

Mark Asquith:

So I think to me, it's just, it's always been defined as just doing what I want when I want to do it and just being happy and content in doing so.

Mark Asquith:

that's why I suck at having jobs because there's always someone telling you what to do.

Mark Asquith:

Mm.

Vit Muller:

And you've got an interesting story.

Vit Muller:

I watch you around a TEDx at the university you had in UK about that.

Vit Muller:

So tell me and a for the listeners, just to give it of an insight, a bit of a short version of that speech, because I know that you very early on in your twenties, you've,

Vit Muller:

And I think a lot more people should realize that that soon, rather than when they're 30, 40, that they've wasted not wasted, but they could have maybe chose a different path.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, definitely.

Mark Asquith:

And you know, to be clear, it was.

Mark Asquith:

It was wasted, wasted time for me, it was kind of just to give the context on it.

Mark Asquith:

It was so I was, I was working for just a normal corporate job, you know, I was just doing my normal thing.

Mark Asquith:

Just, just working as you work had always been a bit of an annoyed kid, like a bit of an annoyed frustrated youth.

Mark Asquith:

I just mainly because I think it was I think it was sort of a remnant of just not really having too much when I was younger.

Mark Asquith:

So I sort of felt a little bit pissed off with that.

Mark Asquith:

and just felt a little.

Mark Asquith:

A little frustrated that a lot of people around me had had opportunities and was squandering them because I'd never really had that use of opportunity.

Mark Asquith:

like I've still got friends to this day that have just, you know, they've never really had to do too much work, you know, they've, they've had a heck

Mark Asquith:

Absolutely.

Mark Asquith:

You know, instantly today.

Mark Asquith:

But I think back then I was a little bit annoyed.

Mark Asquith:

and that led me to, to get in these office jobs because to me, like I came from a town that was a mining town and it was, it was always seen as the, the, the real PS

Mark Asquith:

Like nothing more specific than that.

Mark Asquith:

It was just an office job because it was warm.

Mark Asquith:

It was regular.

Mark Asquith:

And you got paid pretty well, you know, reasonably well.

Mark Asquith:

So I was doing this, you know, I did it from 19 to about 23.

Mark Asquith:

And I switched jobs, moved from one job in Leeds, in England to a job in Sheffield.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Equidistant from where I was, where I was living at the time.

Mark Asquith:

And I remember leaving, in fact, really weirdly the guy that was my boss back in the day, reached out to me last night, about nine hours ago.

Mark Asquith:

I've not spoken to him since the day that I'm describing right now.

Mark Asquith:

and I left this job, went down to the new job, got there.

Mark Asquith:

And I was just startled by just how much of the same rubbish it was walked in was it was like someone had transplanted this th the, the rubbish from the left job, the boring,

Mark Asquith:

It was like this weird virtual reality.

Mark Asquith:

So I just left and I think he did about three hours.

Mark Asquith:

and just left.

Mark Asquith:

I would just have never set foot back in an office as a, as an employee since, and that was when I was 23.

Mark Asquith:

And the reason that I did that was just because I was bored of it.

Mark Asquith:

So then what happened was I went from very quickly and you'll have seen this on the TEDx almost overnight.

Mark Asquith:

I did two things happen.

Mark Asquith:

Number one, I started working with my dad who was an electrician that taught me that actually I liked the freedom.

Mark Asquith:

It was harder work, but it was more fulfilling and I could dictate what I wanted to do.

Mark Asquith:

And when, so it was like, okay, turn up rather than turn up at nine o'clock for work.

Mark Asquith:

I'm going to turn up at eight o'clock for work, but I'm going to do it when I want.

Mark Asquith:

And I know I can nip off and I know I can go and get a sandwich at 10 o'clock and I know I can finish the job and leave and I can be on for half, three as long as I've done a really good job.

Mark Asquith:

So that kind of that lifestyle worked because for the first time ever, I was going away on a, on a bit of a lapse holiday.

Mark Asquith:

I was able to save the money for the spending money that I needed plus pay for the entire holiday in record time.

Mark Asquith:

Whilst having the kind of day-to-day life that, you know, no, it was really dictating to me.

Mark Asquith:

And the second thing happened, I mean, ideally after that I'm a pretty good talker, often, so black mowing to a, a job that was just paying a fortune.

Mark Asquith:

Like I went from earning like 20 grand a year into nearly 200 grand at 23, 24 years old.

Mark Asquith:

And I, it was it was this weird scenario where like, that's what, that's what I thought I kind of wanted.

Mark Asquith:

And it was, it w it was nice, you know, it was easy.

Mark Asquith:

I just turn up and train people on a number of things.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Train people out of the NHS staff on, on, on, on clinical systems or for a couple of the contracts I'd worked at work with the ministry of defense I did about nine months.

Mark Asquith:

That'd be a year overall with the ministry of defense, working with the army.

Mark Asquith:

And the two distinct differences between those two organizations.

Mark Asquith:

I was getting paid the same, doing the same job, project management, business change, train, implementation, recruitment systems clinical systems, same job.

Mark Asquith:

the distinct difference was that the NHS would dictate everything to me.

Mark Asquith:

And even if they had nothing for me to do, they would make me sit there looking at a screen for no reason.

Mark Asquith:

The guys at the army day one, I would literally, I would turn up in the, the old major that was, that was working with me, that was my boss at

Mark Asquith:

What time you show up?

Mark Asquith:

I don't care what time you leave, but I trust that you'll do a really, really good job.

Mark Asquith:

And if you do one hour a day or 10 hours a day, but the job is fantastic.

Mark Asquith:

I trust you to do that.

Mark Asquith:

I thought this is fantastic.

Mark Asquith:

And I gave him more.

Mark Asquith:

Because of that, but also I had much more flexibility, so that was the most fulfilling piece, the job.

Mark Asquith:

but at that point I'm only 200 grand a year.

Mark Asquith:

I've learned those lessons.

Mark Asquith:

And then I went back to contract into it in the same money, the 200 grand, a year, 24 years old working just for the NHS.

Mark Asquith:

So the ministry of defense training project finished, we just finished it.

Mark Asquith:

We completed it.

Mark Asquith:

That's when I realized that actually it was the money that I was chasing that I thought I wanted that actually didn't have anything to do with the feelings that I was feeling because I had

Mark Asquith:

But I realized that the thing that really annoyed me was the moment, when they tell him you've got to be there at eight 30, regardless

Mark Asquith:

What a waste of life.

Mark Asquith:

This is you telling me because your angry and because you need to be there.

Mark Asquith:

And because that's what you choose does not mean that I have got to do that because it's a waste of my life.

Mark Asquith:

It's a waste of time.

Mark Asquith:

I'm spending eight hours a day with people I don't really care about.

Mark Asquith:

And I'm, I'm selling my life for 200 grand a year.

Vit Muller:

and with that, so was it also like your job, what you were meant to do that day?

Vit Muller:

Like you could have easily done that at any later time, right?

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

It was, it was, it was more sort of work that could have been, it was.

Mark Asquith:

It was work that didn't need eight hours work, but it was very important work.

Mark Asquith:

So if you did one hour to deliver a training system on a, sorry, a train in training session on a clinical system for a diabetes unit in, in somewhere in

Mark Asquith:

They needed that one sniper shot of knowledge to enable them to care for their patients.

Mark Asquith:

And so it was this very classic example of, of sort of why do you wear a tie?

Mark Asquith:

Well, I dunno, it was just always want to tie, you know, why do you do this?

Mark Asquith:

I don't know.

Mark Asquith:

We've just always done this.

Mark Asquith:

Okay.

Mark Asquith:

Fair enough.

Mark Asquith:

And it was the example of that was very clear.

Mark Asquith:

Like we've always just turned up at eight and left and just, it was pointless.

Mark Asquith:

They couldn't see that they were getting less out of us because they were forcing that upon us.

Mark Asquith:

Like I would have, and I did this with the army guys.

Mark Asquith:

I would have done my hours training, gone home and spent another three or four hours developing training materials that they would have then kept after

Mark Asquith:

And I would have done that on my own time because I'd have been at home.

Mark Asquith:

I wouldn't have had to do the big rush hour commute.

Mark Asquith:

I'd have done it at 2:00 PM instead of 5:30 PM.

Mark Asquith:

But instead, what they got from me was the one hour training, which was always good.

Mark Asquith:

But there then got another seven hours of me setting up my own business on the side, sneakily on their computers because they're, they're,

Mark Asquith:

You will sit there and do it.

Mark Asquith:

So me and my naive 2027 mindset, I was, screw you.

Mark Asquith:

All right.

Mark Asquith:

I'm going to learn.

Mark Asquith:

I'm going to learn how to code websites and, you know, fast forward 15 years.

Mark Asquith:

Thank you very much.

Mark Asquith:

That's brilliant.

Mark Asquith:

you know, that's what started me on this path.

Mark Asquith:

That that's what happened.

Mark Asquith:

And I realized that it was, it was the money that I was chasing and because they believed the money would give me what I wanted, which is the feeling of control, but

Mark Asquith:

And I think a lot of people do the same thing.

Mark Asquith:

They'll go for the money first because they believe it gives them what they need.

Mark Asquith:

But realistically, what they get is a bit of a lifestyle prison.

Mark Asquith:

I just, you just do a bit of content on this, like a lifestyle prison.

Mark Asquith:

So what you end up doing is you assume that you've got success because you've got money, but you build lifestyles and you build a successful kind of visage of what you're doing and you build your

Mark Asquith:

And so you can't stop.

Mark Asquith:

So then when you hit the thing that you do to earn all that money, you, you you've imprisoned yourself because there's no way you want

Mark Asquith:

And so I didn't do this on purpose.

Mark Asquith:

I was just very lucky to stumble across it.

Mark Asquith:

Why did it the other way I gave up the 200 grand job, I went back to earning 20 grand, nearly went bankrupt, doing it.

Mark Asquith:

And I mean, genuinely you know my first web design business, I invested 20 grand of my own cash that I'd saved up, made a mistake in hiring the wrong person sunk called the 20 grand into it.

Mark Asquith:

Eight months later at about 30 pounds in the bank and nothing else.

Mark Asquith:

and.

Mark Asquith:

Just, I just thought, what is going on?

Mark Asquith:

You know, this is another story I can, I can talk about later or whatever.

Mark Asquith:

Like this is a fascinating one.

Mark Asquith:

I sort of, I got an arm put round me by a very good friend of mine who sadly passed away last year, but a mentor and a former business partner of mine who helped

Mark Asquith:

But I did it the other way, where I went back to the 20 grand didn't buy the houses, didn't buy the cars, invested the money, enjoyed spending the money that I earned.

Mark Asquith:

Cause I was in my early twenties, it was brilliant, but then learned how to build something that I then control.

Mark Asquith:

And I've waited another 15, 20 years to buy the things that I could have bought back then, because at least I can then control how I earn the money.

Mark Asquith:

I'm not having to do it on someone else's time or on their agenda.

Mark Asquith:

So that's a, that was an interesting lesson.

Mark Asquith:

I mean, there's, there's piles that we can.

Mark Asquith:

We can dig into on that one.

Vit Muller:

Absolutely.

Vit Muller:

Absolutely.

Vit Muller:

So take away big takeaway point.

Vit Muller:

Yeah.

Vit Muller:

I'm getting from this and correct me if I got it wrong, is that no, you can either chase money, but that might be in costing you in lifestyle and freedom that you, that you normally have otherwise.

Vit Muller:

Or you could start with focusing on the freedom and then design everything else around it.

Vit Muller:

So you can maintain that freedom still pursuing money and still pursuing wealth.

Vit Muller:

you know, whatever career or your business, but doing it on your own terms, right?

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

It definitely definitely kind of just, what's the best way to say this.

Mark Asquith:

It is always about control regardless.

Mark Asquith:

It's about control.

Mark Asquith:

There's never anyone that does anything.

Mark Asquith:

For any other reason, we just think we do it for other reasons.

Mark Asquith:

So we think we do it for the stuff and we think we'd do it for the ego and all that stuff, but we don't, we do it for just to be able to control the healthcare choices that we have, the

Mark Asquith:

We do it because we've got an idea of how we want success to look for us.

Mark Asquith:

And it might be that you need a certain threshold of revenue.

Mark Asquith:

you know, most of the influences that you see online.

Mark Asquith:

I don't think I can think of one that doesn't somehow kind of flaunt their financial status.

Mark Asquith:

Even if they're the ones that are selling quote, unquote value, be humble, be authentic.

Mark Asquith:

It's, it's not like they're not posting pictures of the pool.

Mark Asquith:

You know, it's so you've got to be really, you've got to be really clear on what's going on.

Mark Asquith:

Especially in this online entrepreneur world, you know, you've got to be really, really clear what was going on.

Mark Asquith:

Everyone wants control and everyone wants control of something.

Mark Asquith:

For some people it's control of ego, money enables for certain people it's control of educational lifestyle.

Mark Asquith:

Guess what money gives you that.

Mark Asquith:

And I think the difference is just when you're willing to wait for that control to happen.

Mark Asquith:

There's a lot of kids, my brothers, one of them he's a pain in the ass he wants the control, but he's not educated himself enough to be

Mark Asquith:

AKA, he has not developed himself into something saleable, but he wants all the stuff that goes with it.

Mark Asquith:

That's one set of people that put money first and assume it will lead to control the other people.

Mark Asquith:

You know, a lot of the online entrepreneurs, a lot of the, the SaaS the Saas founders, people like yourself will put the discipline and the control in

Mark Asquith:

And then when the reward comes, those people that didn't do that say, well, y'all lucky that's an overnight success.

Mark Asquith:

And you're like, well, okay, you think that, but you know, we, we know that that's not true.

Mark Asquith:

So this, you know, th th I don't know if that helps our answers a question, but it's, it's, it's, it's a fascinating nuance, you know?

Vit Muller:

Absolutely.

Vit Muller:

And look to my perspective as well, which is not, not different from what you're saying, but to put it on a simple terms for me, definition of success

Vit Muller:

No go my partner next to me, my son.

Vit Muller:

I want to have the ability to say, you know what?

Vit Muller:

Let's let's go, let's go for brekkie to some good coffee shop and jump in the car and go to the coast today.

Vit Muller:

Just go and smell it.

Vit Muller:

Always just go fishing and whatever, just having that, like`you said, control freedom, whatever you want to call it, the freedom to be able to do what you want at any point, obviously it's easier said

Vit Muller:

I mean, the whole reason I'm doing this podcast is to eventually, and it's in a way, sounds a little bit selfish, but eventually grows into a platform where I'm making more impact to

Vit Muller:

I don't want to piss off anybody.

Vit Muller:

But, you know, so that's the whole, that's the whole thing for me.

Vit Muller:

I'm just being completely honest.

Vit Muller:

And this is why I'm doing this podcast too.

Vit Muller:

Yes.

Vit Muller:

I'm selling it as I want to give everybody more value.

Vit Muller:

I want to inspire others, but in a way it's a week or I'm building week, I'm just being honest.

Vit Muller:

And you know, and just coming from, from somebody who's had a business for 8 years, I've run my own fitness business.

Vit Muller:

I've been a personal trainer in Sydney for 8 years going through all that, going through all that pain, going through, you know, changing all the heads.

Vit Muller:

I know all the hardware that goes into it.

Vit Muller:

I have made a decision to have a, a full-time job now.

Vit Muller:

but that's just a purely, just a that's good.

Vit Muller:

It's meaning it's a, it's a, what do you say meaning to its end?

Vit Muller:

You know,

Vit Muller:

. Mark Asquith: Well, to be fair, man.

Vit Muller:

That's what, what is fascinating with that?

Vit Muller:

Is that again, you've controlled it and you're right with the freedom of getting up and doing the coffee shop and the breakfast and the beach room.

Vit Muller:

Like all of that stuff is, is exactly.

Vit Muller:

What I'm talking about and you've nailed it, but the job stuff is fascinating to me.

Vit Muller:

Like I've always said that if I ever stopped doing what I'm doing, I will retrain as an electrician or a plumber.

Vit Muller:

And I will just get a job because it's not the job.

Vit Muller:

That's the problem.

Vit Muller:

But it's the control, like I said, and you know, if you've got your home paid for, and if you've got your kids in school and you can afford to live the lifestyle that you want

Vit Muller:

Absolutely.

Vit Muller:

Oh yeah.

Vit Muller:

A big one.

Vit Muller:

I mean, absolutely.

Vit Muller:

I mean, I often I'll often talk about, you know, running your own business and, but it doesn't have to be, it doesn't mean that you need to have a business to have all this freedom.

Vit Muller:

You can, you can certainly do it through career as well.

Vit Muller:

Worked for somebody as long as you negotiate, you make it, you know, work for you, right.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, exactly.

Mark Asquith:

That is, that is exactly it.

Mark Asquith:

And for me, like I'm a terrible boss sorry, not a terrible boss.

Mark Asquith:

I mean, I probably am a terrible boss in all fairness, if you ask the team, but I'm a terrible employee for bosses because bosses, most of the time are rubbish.

Mark Asquith:

They are rubbish because they've, welched on their success.

Mark Asquith:

They've done the thing that we talked about earlier, they've gone for the cash.

Mark Asquith:

They've taken the steady path.

Mark Asquith:

They've gone the one rung at a time.

Mark Asquith:

And guess what?

Mark Asquith:

Climbing a ladder one rung at a time.

Mark Asquith:

It's really hard to hold yourself on one rung for a year or two years.

Mark Asquith:

At a time you get tired.

Mark Asquith:

Your body gets achey

Mark Asquith:

your mind gets achey and then, every now and again, you get will be, you can pull yourself up to the next room for a little bit more, but then you do that other 34 years and suddenly

Mark Asquith:

And so you project that onto everyone else.

Mark Asquith:

And so a lot of, I wouldn't say me, you know, I wouldn't say every boss, of course not.

Mark Asquith:

You know, this is very individualistic, but in my experience, certainly more of the older style bosses who believe in the nine to five, who believe in doing things

Mark Asquith:

It's just, it's something that I've seen time and time and time and time again.

Mark Asquith:

you know, whether that is with myself as an employee in the past, whether that's with family members that have gone through this process, whether it's with employees that come into the

Mark Asquith:

You know, people get angry, man.

Mark Asquith:

People get angry and it's because largely it's because again, they can't control what's going on in their lives.

Mark Asquith:

They still have to do the 5am get up to get there for 8:00 AM when the rest of the world is moving on from that.

Mark Asquith:

yeah, you've always got to be conscious of what's really going on with people and this, I think there's, it's always bad to see people bashing people

Mark Asquith:

And it's normally the new entrepreneurs that are not making any money.

Mark Asquith:

Right.

Mark Asquith:

They're normally feel great for making the jump into quote unquote entrepreneurship and bash the people that have got the jobs that are notifies for suckers.

Mark Asquith:

no, it's not for suckers is not for suckers at all.

Mark Asquith:

It you've just got to find what's right for you.

Mark Asquith:

And we should all respect.

Mark Asquith:

Every version of that for every person, because there's always a bigger fish to quote, quite haggle on Jim from star Wars.

Mark Asquith:

There's always a bigger fish, man.

Vit Muller:

See, I did say you're a Star Wars fan at the beginning didn't I?

Vit Muller:

And yeah, absolutely.

Vit Muller:

Totally.

Vit Muller:

Right.

Vit Muller:

Yep.

Vit Muller:

I mean, there's so many, you know, 18 year old entrepreneurs, Instagram, you know, either pursue that or Instagram path or whatnot.

Vit Muller:

And they all get inspired.

Vit Muller:

They go Tony Robbins and all that.

Vit Muller:

It's all exciting.

Vit Muller:

Right?

Vit Muller:

You get the, and I know because I did the whole thing myself and I went not Instagram, but now going to all these personal development events, Tony Robbins

Vit Muller:

You're like, you're going all in.

Vit Muller:

Guess what?

Vit Muller:

Going all in on your own, especially got no cash.

Vit Muller:

And I literally had no cash.

Vit Muller:

I arrived with nothing to Australia on student visa when you're bootstrapping things.

Vit Muller:

It's, it's.

Vit Muller:

You know, it's not always going to lead to success.

Vit Muller:

You might end up put a whole lot of your hard work and years into it and nothing comes out.

Vit Muller:

So you gotta think about that because you know, when you're in your twenties, that's there's massive opportunity.

Vit Muller:

You don't want to miss it because then you get to the thirties and you use your life changes.

Vit Muller:

You have different priorities.

Vit Muller:

yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Sorry to jump in on that one, dude.

Mark Asquith:

I think you're right.

Mark Asquith:

And I think it's an important point just to mention if you look at the gurus out there, I've got a serious litmus test for two litmus tests that you can use for the, for the gurus.

Mark Asquith:

It's easy to make someone feel good.

Mark Asquith:

It really is.

Mark Asquith:

You say the right words at the right time and you say them loudly.

Mark Asquith:

And if you can say I'm around other people because the halo effect works, but the litmus test is this.

Mark Asquith:

If after you are excited and the excitement has calmed down, if you can go to that person's website and you can add a look at their income report, so you can look at their revenue through

Mark Asquith:

That's a ticking a box.

Mark Asquith:

If it stays the same, even if it's PI, but stares at the same, there's potentially a problem because growth is required.

Mark Asquith:

I can't think of any other business where you go.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, it's all right.

Mark Asquith:

To stay the same.

Mark Asquith:

It's fine.

Mark Asquith:

Don't worry about growth.

Mark Asquith:

Cool.

Mark Asquith:

So that's the first litmus test.

Mark Asquith:

The second list litmus test is the biggest one.

Mark Asquith:

Every entrepreneur, podcast coach, funnel expert, Facebook expert, whatever it is will get you excited about what you should do.

Mark Asquith:

When that excitement has disappeared and subsided, go back to them and ask them specifically, and not in buzzy terms, not in add value

Mark Asquith:

None of that crap.

Mark Asquith:

That's all top of the top of the real top of the tree stuff.

Mark Asquith:

That's just superficial stuff.

Mark Asquith:

Ask them.

Mark Asquith:

Can you tell me exactly what to do?

Mark Asquith:

And can you specifically walk me through the tangible implementation steps to do it?

Mark Asquith:

Not, not the, not the sneaky implementation steps.

Mark Asquith:

So this is the normal path.

Mark Asquith:

All right, I'll take, this is the normal guru pros.

Mark Asquith:

You only get one life.

Mark Asquith:

If you believe in a plan B, then you don't believe enough in your planner.

Mark Asquith:

You've got to go all in.

Mark Asquith:

What's the worst that can happen.

Mark Asquith:

Focus, follow one course.

Mark Asquith:

And so till success you have got to nail this, you have only got one chance to do this.

Mark Asquith:

Life is too short.

Mark Asquith:

Well, how do I do with that then?

Mark Asquith:

Well, you asked your audience what they want and then you, you kill it.

Mark Asquith:

You give that to them and then you make sure the add value, but guess what?

Mark Asquith:

The extra mile is the road less traveled yet.

Mark Asquith:

That's, you know, the conscious entrepreneur needs to ask.

Mark Asquith:

That's brilliant.

Mark Asquith:

And it sounds fantastic, but I asked how you do it.

Mark Asquith:

I didn't ask for some concepts that might get me closer to how I do it.

Mark Asquith:

I asked for specifically, how do I do it?

Mark Asquith:

And if you want to get really clear on it, how do I do it today?

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, in 2021 and 2022, not 2018 or 2015 or 2013 or 2009.

Mark Asquith:

Or 1980, how do I do it today?

Mark Asquith:

And if you get a good answer, that's your guru.

Mark Asquith:

But if you get a good answer, you need to let everyone else know because there aren't many good answers out there.

Vit Muller:

We've got a really good segue from here, Mark, when I was looking for, you know, when I was thinking about launching this podcast, which is a

Vit Muller:

I've looked at all of them.

Vit Muller:

And at the end, the Captivate came on top.

Vit Muller:

Now, not just because you know how it all came across in a free trial and all that.

Vit Muller:

It was that's initially what got me in, but what got me to stay is the amount of value that you and your team provide.

Vit Muller:

And it's no wishy wishy-washy motivational speeches.

Vit Muller:

None of you guys.

Vit Muller:

You're a good example of that.

Vit Muller:

What do you just said?

Vit Muller:

You know, providing specific steps, how you do that and, you know, time and time again, every week I jump in and Facebook group or, you know, get emails from you you give me specific

Vit Muller:

I mean, in retrospect, I mean, there's nothing wrong with going to occasional in a personal development event or going keep a copy.

Vit Muller:

I keep quoting Tony Robbins, but any of those likes there's nothing wrong.

Vit Muller:

I mean, you get that kickstart, you get that boost.

Vit Muller:

I mean, it's a good feeling, but you definitely have to have somebody as well, who gives you that blueprint?

Vit Muller:

And you've certainly done that.

Vit Muller:

So I just wanted to say thank you for that.

Mark Asquith:

No, thank you.

Mark Asquith:

And, and, and you're absolutely right in as far as, excuse me, the, the, the, the place is these gurus and, and this, this motivational stuff fits in.

Mark Asquith:

It has a place, and there's nothing wrong with it.

Mark Asquith:

The problem is that people see as the complete picture and the end to the means, but it's not.

Mark Asquith:

It's one piece of a far bigger picture.

Mark Asquith:

And it's the beginning.

Mark Asquith:

It's the, it's the first.

Mark Asquith:

But because you know, there's a reason that these people can still keep trimming out the same message year on year.

Mark Asquith:

And it's because new people always need to hear the motivation.

Mark Asquith:

You know, you, you need y'all know this as a personal trainer.

Mark Asquith:

Day one in the gym is, is the hardest bit, day 2 when you feel a little sore and you can feel that the work is paying off, even though you can't see it yet, you can feel it.

Mark Asquith:

You can feel something's different.

Mark Asquith:

Day 2 is easier.

Mark Asquith:

what they're doing is they're giving you day one, they're giving you the motivation that you need.

Mark Asquith:

They're giving you that inspiration.

Mark Asquith:

Th the worry that I always have, people quit their jobs and their livelihoods best on this.

Mark Asquith:

And I used to do a little bit of mentoring and, and, and stuff I still do.

Mark Asquith:

In fact, when COVID not withstanding for a lot of startups, a lot of startups, like how was he even told this?

Mark Asquith:

I used to, when I used to run the design and digital ads, you quit the agency to go all in on, on podcast websites.

Mark Asquith:

And I was like, well, I love podcasts websites.

Mark Asquith:

There's the business I really, really do.

Mark Asquith:

But the addressable market is too small to, to scale this thing right now.

Mark Asquith:

So we need to do other things and we've got other ideas and those captivate productivity and the other stuff.

Mark Asquith:

And then we can come back to podcast websites, revamped that pivoted slightly open it, more of an addressable market.

Mark Asquith:

Had I listened to the motivational people.

Mark Asquith:

I'd equip my job.

Mark Asquith:

I'd equip my agency that are built up too early and wouldn't have been able to have the space that I need now, a word on space.

Mark Asquith:

Okay.

Mark Asquith:

So we've got to take these gurus and these entrepreneurs as what they are, which is you've said, it's that they are the day one.

Mark Asquith:

They are to get through the gym door and that's fine.

Mark Asquith:

We all need that.

Mark Asquith:

But they're not quit the job to work in the gym every single day.

Mark Asquith:

You know, if you wanna, if you genuinely want to have a lifestyle where you are constantly at 7% body fat and constantly fit as a fiddle than it is a profession, or it requires a heck of a

Mark Asquith:

And a lot of people don't see that about business.

Mark Asquith:

They see businesses, a light switch, an on or off I'm in RMO.

Mark Asquith:

And when I do the static mentor, and it's not the case, like the on or off is feeding your kids and it needs to be bloody on all the time and the on or off

Mark Asquith:

And there's a reason that VCs and startup funds and seed funders and angels.

Mark Asquith:

Want the founders to take a good salary out of that investment.

Mark Asquith:

Because if you, as a business owner are worried about money, you ain't worried about growing the business.

Mark Asquith:

You're worried about the next bill payment.

Mark Asquith:

That's why founders want you to take the decent salary when they invest, sorry.

Mark Asquith:

That's why VCs and so on.

Mark Asquith:

And so the problem is that there's a gap.

Mark Asquith:

There's a disparity between what gurus tell people to do as a next step, which is go all in, go all in my advice is don't go all in with the physicality side of it.

Mark Asquith:

Don't go all in with the nine to five quitting, because if you do, your mortgage comes all out and your ability to feed people comes all out.

Mark Asquith:

And remember, those entrepreneurs are the ones that I mentioned earlier that had 20, 40, 50, 60, 70 grand to put into the VAs.

Mark Asquith:

When they're started, they didn't go all in there.

Mark Asquith:

Just had a bit of space.

Mark Asquith:

So the job is to understand if you want to start something.

Mark Asquith:

But it's not a light switch going from having a job to not a job and being your own person is not a light switch.

Mark Asquith:

It took me two years of learning, how to code websites to be able to sell websites.

Mark Asquith:

And I was slowly able to supplement my income by 500 pound a month, then a grand a month, and then two grand a month.

Mark Asquith:

And then suddenly, wait a minute.

Mark Asquith:

I'm earning my wages at 20 odd.

Mark Asquith:

So I may as well quit because maybe I could earn a little bit more through this freelance stuff now.

Mark Asquith:

And then, you know, those, we get the growth.

Mark Asquith:

Yep.

Mark Asquith:

So that segue is important.

Mark Asquith:

People don't realize that and they're meant to feel bad for thinking like that.

Mark Asquith:

When in reality, there are very few, there are very few genuine business owners and entrepreneurs that jumped into their entrepreneurial business with nothing.

Mark Asquith:

Most of them had something, whether it was redundancy, payout, whether it was savings, they had a runway, they had a year or six months.

Vit Muller:

Great way to go out there.

Vit Muller:

This has been put on us by one of my guests in a couple of episodes back Adam Markel.

Vit Muller:

He said, you essentially, what you're doing is you've got a bridge going on in your life.

Vit Muller:

You've got a bridge let's bridge representing your income, right?

Vit Muller:

You've got a job.

Vit Muller:

That's the bridge.

Vit Muller:

Now you want to have more freedom.

Vit Muller:

You start, you know, you thinking about this other bridge, but you can't destroy the first bridge unless you build that second bridge.

Vit Muller:

Otherwise, I mean, how are you going to cross over?

Vit Muller:

Right.

Vit Muller:

So always think about that.

Vit Muller:

That's, that's a good, like just a visual analogy, always build a second bridge while you've got the first bridge.

Vit Muller:

Because like you said, you know, when, if you go and you got those stories, I mean, there's stories of those people that said, Oh, you know, I went all in and, and it worked out, but.

Vit Muller:

That's you're really playing with odds and that's the chances that this will happen to you, that you will, you know, hit that luck.

Vit Muller:

It's just so small.

Vit Muller:

and right,

Mark Asquith:

Just a very tiny thing to remember.

Mark Asquith:

They often start with money.

Mark Asquith:

They had something saved or redundancy or something, but they don't mention that very often because it's not sexy.

Mark Asquith:

And when they go all in all the mean is they go all in on focus.

Mark Asquith:

That's their sole driver is the thing that they're focused on.

Mark Asquith:

They might only spend two hours a day on it because they're working.

Mark Asquith:

But that is the thing that consumes them.

Mark Asquith:

Like when I was learning web coding and building captivate, I was all in on it, but there were days I only work two hours because it was a Saturday.

Mark Asquith:

And I had the family to see, that doesn't mean I was less all in, it was just about focus, but sorry, I interjected, sorry.

Mark Asquith:

No, no, no.

Vit Muller:

You're all right.

Vit Muller:

It's just all fits in.

Vit Muller:

You know, I was just going to say, basically on top of that is that you were able to do that because you had a safety net.

Vit Muller:

Your example, anyone's example, who's going all in.

Vit Muller:

As long as they've got an safety then they've got something saved up and enough saved up, not to have to worry about where's that next bill coming in.

Vit Muller:

Only then can you fully, fully focus on what you're doing and you will actually do it really well.

Vit Muller:

And you should, you should able to see, you know, whatever you do to accelerate quite fast.

Vit Muller:

But the opposite is if you don't have that financial security and you thinking about, okay, where's my next paycheck comes in.

Vit Muller:

You put yourself in that stressful situation when we are stressed and there's no way people say, Oh no, I'll handle it.

Vit Muller:

There's no way.

Vit Muller:

I mean, it's, it's just in a human nature.

Vit Muller:

It's it's, you know, you think talk about Maslow's pyramid.

Vit Muller:

You've got to have a roof over your, the basic needs.

Vit Muller:

You, you have to have that.

Vit Muller:

If you don't have that, you're a little monkey brain in the back.

Vit Muller:

It's just going to kick in and put, you know, put you in that fight or flight.

Vit Muller:

As soon as that happens, you might call that I'm hustling.

Vit Muller:

Because you grinding through yes.

Vit Muller:

Your stress and you might call that a it's all right.

Vit Muller:

But it's not because what's happening is when you're in fight or flight, your IQ goes down.

Vit Muller:

It's just a physiological thing.

Vit Muller:

You can't, you, can't not, you know, you can't say that's not happening.

Vit Muller:

It will happen.

Vit Muller:

Right.

Vit Muller:

So you will get more stupid because you're more stressed.

Vit Muller:

you'll get more annoying.

Vit Muller:

You'll start making more stupid decisions, more rash decisions.

Vit Muller:

And, and that's just a vicious cycle, because as a result of those stupid decisions, you see yourself going even further, you know, three steps back, and then you think that going.

Vit Muller:

going, going even all in I mean, I'm sort of talking about myself in a way, because I've went through that and I've been a personal trainer and,

Vit Muller:

I got to pay for my school.

Vit Muller:

I got to save enough money.

Vit Muller:

Okay.

Vit Muller:

How many clients have got booked in next week?

Vit Muller:

I've got built my website and then, you know, and then going to these motivational events.

Vit Muller:

And then I bought, you know, if you guys know what's his name?

Vit Muller:

he wrote the book 10 X Grant Cardone.

Vit Muller:

Right.

Vit Muller:

I bought his book 10 X, and then I read the book and it just basically, in a nutshell, it's the says, if you're working in hard work it, if

Vit Muller:

And so I just went even moral Olin.

Vit Muller:

The way I did it is I just reduce my sleep.

Vit Muller:

It was nuts.

Vit Muller:

It was nuts.

Vit Muller:

It does not work.

Vit Muller:

You have to have a safety net.

Vit Muller:

If you don't have a safety net, get a job and then do this on the side.

Vit Muller:

Otherwise I don't, I don't see.

Mark Asquith:

No, it's true.

Mark Asquith:

And it's who, like you said, that Maslow's hierarchy is, is, is a complete and utter representation of, of reality.

Mark Asquith:

It really is.

Mark Asquith:

And, and, and a lot of people do forget that a lot of people really do get fired up.

Mark Asquith:

and a good example of this is you know, you'll, you'll appreciate this being a PT and, and being clearly at a fit and healthy guy, like

Mark Asquith:

Cause we've been building captivate out and that's, you know, that takes up a lot of time.

Mark Asquith:

There are a lot of, a lot of things that require my attention and, and, and frankly, I get lazy and I think, wow, you know, I'll exercise tomorrow.

Mark Asquith:

So this year, you know, I've gone right back to that.

Mark Asquith:

But what I did was.

Mark Asquith:

Rather than going back to what I could do when I was 31, 30 and 29.

Mark Asquith:

And you know, when I was training every day, twice a day, sometimes what I was able to do, because I'd learned this, this, this bridge analogy that

Mark Asquith:

It's just, I need to get fitness back to a level that it used to be.

Mark Asquith:

And ideally, I'd like to look a bit better.

Mark Asquith:

Of course, we'd all like to look a bit better, but I'm not going to jump in and assume I can do eight hours a day.

Mark Asquith:

Instead of I'm actually just going to go right back to basics.

Mark Asquith:

And I'm just going to focus on my macros and my nutrition.

Mark Asquith:

And I'm going to focus directly on simple compound basics for 40 minutes a day and enough cardio to make my heart thing.

Mark Asquith:

What the hell are you doing like that is it.

Mark Asquith:

I didn't go back to what I was doing.

Mark Asquith:

But that doesn't mean that I've gone less all in because I'm still getting my ass into the gym every day to do it.

Mark Asquith:

Even when it's my gym is downstairs in the guard, like sometimes do it.

Mark Asquith:

It's one degree in there he's freezing, but I still we'll do it because I'm all in, but I'm not quit my job.

Mark Asquith:

I'm not working less.

Mark Asquith:

I'm not seeing some less, she's still see me as much as she did.

Mark Asquith:

I'm still watching one division and play my PlayStation and going out and feeding the ducks in the garden and all, you know, all that stuff that I did before.

Mark Asquith:

And that doesn't mean that I'm less all in on this other stuff that I've reintroduced.

Mark Asquith:

And it's I can't think of any other example where being all in would mean sacrificing everything apart from maybe the younger days of elite athletes, you know, Michael Phelps, Tiger Woods.

Mark Asquith:

They sacrificed everything to become the top of the tree, but.

Mark Asquith:

For many entrepreneurs and business owners and people searching success.

Mark Asquith:

We're not actually after being at the top of the tree because no one can decide what the top of the tree is.

Mark Asquith:

It's a big wide, broad tree and just a shed ton of branches on it all where you want to be as a little bit higher up and controlling where we are at any given time.

Mark Asquith:

So the point that I'm making the salient piece to take from that, I think is just be realistic about what's going on because success is something that if you have all the

Mark Asquith:

No that's looking successful.

Mark Asquith:

And that is really different.

Vit Muller:

In which case you really have to ask yourself, are you doing it for yourself or are you doing it for others?

Vit Muller:

Because you want to be perceived in certain way, in which case you will need to have a deep.

Vit Muller:

you know, ask yourself deep down is this serving you?

Vit Muller:

Is this no,

Mark Asquith:

actually that's a really good point, man.

Mark Asquith:

so I'm not really into cars very recently.

Mark Asquith:

Very recently.

Mark Asquith:

We've got a Karen and I have got a through one of the businesses.

Mark Asquith:

We ended up getting a Tesla on lease, which is amazing.

Mark Asquith:

Like the model three performance thing.

Mark Asquith:

I love it.

Mark Asquith:

It's like the fastest thing that you're ever likely to get in apart from the other Teslas.

Mark Asquith:

I love it.

Mark Asquith:

Right.

Mark Asquith:

But I don't care about cars genuinely.

Mark Asquith:

Don't give a crap about them.

Mark Asquith:

It's just a means to an end for me.

Mark Asquith:

So before this, I always had fairly crappy cars, you know, it was just these cars that, you know, I bought them and I was like, well, I'll just run this until it dies.

Mark Asquith:

I don't give a crap about what it looks like now.

Mark Asquith:

Here's the thing, right?

Mark Asquith:

The perception of me.

Mark Asquith:

Amongst the people that used to know me in the old building that we had the businesses in before we moved to, to where the studio is.

Mark Asquith:

Now I've seen a few of these people.

Mark Asquith:

Recently, the person option of me has changed because I've got this Tesla.

Mark Asquith:

They're like, Oh, you're doing well.

Mark Asquith:

Like, why am I doing well?

Mark Asquith:

Just because I can afford a 300 quid a month lease through the business.

Mark Asquith:

I, that I'm not doing it for you to look at that and think, yeah, wow, we are doing well.

Mark Asquith:

It's just, there was a really cheap deal on Teslas.

Mark Asquith:

And there's a pile of tax relief because they're green cars.

Mark Asquith:

Like I don't really care about the fact that it's a Tesla flip the other way.

Mark Asquith:

When I had the crap car still running seven figure businesses still at team of 10, I was still traveling all over the world and speaking at Harvard and doing the TEDxes.

Mark Asquith:

But I had a run car that was beat up and drop into pieces.

Mark Asquith:

Cause I did not give a crap and I didn't want, I had no reason to impress other people with a bloody car.

Mark Asquith:

And they always assumed that business was bad.

Mark Asquith:

And I was like, well, that's all right.

Mark Asquith:

You can assume that makes the difference to me.

Mark Asquith:

You're not my customers.

Mark Asquith:

It's all right.

Mark Asquith:

And it just goes to show that if you chase the wrong thing, you'll get the ego pats, you'll get the feeling of success.

Mark Asquith:

You'll get people telling you that you're doing well, but you'll know what's really going on.

Mark Asquith:

You will know what's going on.

Mark Asquith:

And it's the old cliche, you know, a struggling salesman turns up in a new car, like as an entrepreneur.

Mark Asquith:

If that's not the thing to be chasing, forget Instagram, the laptop beach lifestyle, forget the, you know, the, the, the, the kind of entrepreneurs that rent a plane and take some

Mark Asquith:

and they're doing it.

Mark Asquith:

They are absolutely, like you said, my man, they are doing it for other people so that other people go, I want to be like that person.

Mark Asquith:

Big big trap dude,

Vit Muller:

worst case scenario.

Vit Muller:

They might even use it as a magnet to then sell you onto the course to make you believe that, you know, if you buy their course, then that's a path through the same lifestyle as they have it.

Vit Muller:

So many of these, so many of those it's ridiculous.

Mark Asquith:

They also do th th they'll just do those two things you mentioned earlier, they'll miss the litmus tests.

Mark Asquith:

They'll fail the test.

Mark Asquith:

So they'll get you motivated.

Mark Asquith:

They'll get you through the Dawn day one, get you motivated and make you feel really well.

Mark Asquith:

They'll tell you what they should, what you should do in broad terms, top level macro terms, but when it comes to the, how their courses will be

Mark Asquith:

We used to have someone that wants to get involved in Captivate who, you know, frankly, Got a fair audience, but couldn't add anything to the software.

Mark Asquith:

It doesn't have to build software.

Mark Asquith:

Doesn't have to scale software, doesn't have to run a CX team, a UX team or UI team, a design team, a D team of developers doesn't know

Mark Asquith:

but doesn't know how to scale a SaaS business.

Mark Asquith:

You know, it's different, it's different.

Mark Asquith:

And they, you know, they came in wanting 10%.

Mark Asquith:

And if I had a based my decisions based on Instagram and the macro stuff, the big motivational.

Mark Asquith:

So at aI'd have given 10% of my company, away to someone suddenly that would have been out of their depth within six months.

Mark Asquith:

and it's, it's, it's not to say that they're not good at what they do is just that what they do, doesn't fit everything.

Mark Asquith:

And I think that's another lesson with the online entrepreneurs.

Mark Asquith:

Like they have very good at what they do, but what you do.

Mark Asquith:

Might not be what they are good at.

Mark Asquith:

So take the motivation, take the inspiration from them, but don't assume that they know how to grow your type of business.

Mark Asquith:

do this so much we could go into.

Vit Muller:

Absolutely.

Vit Muller:

I was gonna add a point where you talk about body fat stuff, but you know, if you want to get to 7% it's actually really hard to stay there.

Vit Muller:

It's, it's actually better to maybe stay around 15% for the most part.

Vit Muller:

And then maybe when it gets to summer to shave it off a little bit, but I don't really know that many people who stay at 7% for that long, which is a good analogy to, to the business.

Vit Muller:

You know, if you're trying to always chase that top, top, you know, perception for everybody else to, to look schmick and plain and fancy car deep inside, you might not

Vit Muller:

but you might also just get overall attention that you might not be happy about because you don't have a way to sort of hide or, you know,

Vit Muller:

So maybe it's just better to be at 15% rather than at 7%.

Mark Asquith:

I agree, man.

Mark Asquith:

And when I get from, when I get down from a 47% to 15, I'll let you know

Mark Asquith:

Holy God.

Mark Asquith:

No, no, I don't know why I'm out at a minute.

Mark Asquith:

I think I'm maybe about 21, 22.

Mark Asquith:

I reckon I've put a bit on

Vit Muller:

21%, 22% that's pretty good.

Vit Muller:

We, we generally say for guys, you want to be between 10- 20% so that's a healthy range so once you get to about 15%, that's when you

Mark Asquith:

I've got, I've got, certainly got a one pack at the minute and it's like this beautiful barrel.

Vit Muller:

Well, but it's certainly working towards improving that.

Vit Muller:

Right?

Vit Muller:

And like you said, you haven't went all in which we call weekend warriors going all in and then they fail after six weeks or three weeks because it's not sustainable.

Vit Muller:

You when the smart path, I like that, you know, compound simple, big lifts, big bang for the buck type of movements in the, in the time that you have left while.

Vit Muller:

You're obviously in a growth phase of your company.

Vit Muller:

So it just makes perfect sense.

Vit Muller:

And the number one thing that you can make the most influence is obviously nutrition.

Vit Muller:

100% always start with nutrition, anybody listening to this right now, if you thinking about, and I know we sort of talk a lot about business, but when it comes to success, when

Vit Muller:

And so it's so important to make sure that you do that too, because, how do you expect to perform properly and running a company such as Captivate

Vit Muller:

I mean, how do you expect to perform at your peak if you're not looking after your body, right?

Vit Muller:

I mean, you go and you go, people are relying on you, not just your employees, customers, right?

Vit Muller:

So as an example, so anybody listening to this right now, if have been listening to this podcast and use, you know, constantly thinking about this success as a thing of business

Mark Asquith:

I can understand that as well because I, I you know, one of the biggest fallacies as a business owner is that you don't have time to do it.

Mark Asquith:

and, and you inevitably get worse.

Mark Asquith:

You do, you get worse.

Mark Asquith:

And the thing that I've noticed is that the periods of burnout th the space between them becomes far less and less and less, and it's a continually diminishing period because you, you, you do.

Mark Asquith:

You find yourself in this, in this position where you, you know, you get a bit tired and, and, and you think I ain't got time to work out.

Mark Asquith:

So you have a couple of days off you, you kind of replenish yourself a little bit from this burnout and then actually the space between, or the space and the time until the

Mark Asquith:

All you're doing is refilling the glass of energy and willpower, but the glasses and the capacity in that glass is becoming far less.

Mark Asquith:

Every time you do it because you not, you're not structurally changing anything.

Mark Asquith:

You're not giving it the, the structure and the infrastructure to be able to hold more stuff, to be able to hold more weight.

Mark Asquith:

So you get, you get worse and worse and worse, man.

Mark Asquith:

You're absolutely right.

Vit Muller:

And if you don't handle it and you keep on pushing through the stress, the cycle of stress on and on and on, as really good podcast, by the way, we're not going to cover too much more

Vit Muller:

so just look him up.

Vit Muller:

It's one of the past, I think maybe episode three or four, four episodes back.

Vit Muller:

he is a corporate wellness coach and he gave a really good example about one of these type of clients.

Vit Muller:

You know, lawyers, they oftentimes have huge deadlines, work crazy hours under the pump, a lot of stress.

Vit Muller:

And instead of him going and pitching to them, he's, you know, circuit training or something that's like of a high intensity nature.

Vit Muller:

Instead he propose proposes to them to do.

Vit Muller:

yoga or something that can put you in balance because if you've got a homeostasis, right.

Vit Muller:

And when we had constant fight or flight you're in that stress mode, your body doesn't function properly.

Vit Muller:

So you got to give yourself a room to switch off and balance yourself back down to homeostasis, you know, reduced cortisol in your blood stream and all that.

Vit Muller:

and only then you can start being a bit more optimal and also if, if, if you want to get something practical mindful eating, it's a form of meditation.

Vit Muller:

I'm not a huge fan of meditation.

Vit Muller:

not that it's not great.

Vit Muller:

I'm just, I'm not just, I'm not, I'm not your guy, but Eating go for lunch.

Vit Muller:

Try days.

Vit Muller:

If you're feeling stressed, go for lunch and have your lunch in the park.

Vit Muller:

Right?

Vit Muller:

Leave your phone at the office.

Vit Muller:

Just go and grab, take away whatever lunch, lunch, take your lunch to the, to the park, sit down and just focus on the act of eating for 15 minutes.

Vit Muller:

It's amazing what it does in 15 minutes.

Vit Muller:

You finish and you'll feel refreshed.

Vit Muller:

so just so we can add something really practically in this episode on that topic.

Vit Muller:

I like it, man.

Vit Muller:

Yeah.

Vit Muller:

I like it.

Vit Muller:

Mark.

Vit Muller:

Initially, when I booked you in for this episode, I was thinking, you know what, we're going to talk a lot about podcasting because that's what your specialty, but we never really got to that.

Vit Muller:

We talked so much about career and so much other stuff, which is all great.

Vit Muller:

And we provided so much wisdom and I'm so grateful to, to, to do that.

Vit Muller:

But do you think that we could perhaps do another episode so that for those that are listening, that are interesting in.

Vit Muller:

You know, podcasting space and, and what podcasting could do for them.

Vit Muller:

And, you know, maybe a little more technical one as well, a bit of a blueprint as well.

Vit Muller:

Cover a bit more of that.

Vit Muller:

Do you think we could do that in a couple of couple of weeks time?

Mark Asquith:

Absolutely.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, let's do it, man.

Mark Asquith:

Let's yeah.

Mark Asquith:

Let's do a podcast and chat as well.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah.

Mark Asquith:

It's I used to do a lot of interviews like this one.

Mark Asquith:

I've not done any for a few years, cause everything has been podcasting.

Mark Asquith:

So this has been a nice change, man.

Mark Asquith:

So I appreciate it.

Mark Asquith:

But of course let's let's do another session for sure.

Vit Muller:

Awesome.

Vit Muller:

Now on, on a closing, what would be the top three things that you'd like our listeners listening to this episode today to walk If you're gonna with.

Mark Asquith:

If you're gonna walk away with anything.

Mark Asquith:

I think it's just understanding that that you've got to number one.

Mark Asquith:

You've got to understand what, what success really feels like for you.

Mark Asquith:

And that's a really big distinction notice.

Mark Asquith:

I didn't say what it looks like.

Mark Asquith:

It's what it feels like.

Mark Asquith:

And that is a really big difference, really, really big distinction.

Mark Asquith:

Number two, you've got to understand what it takes to get there.

Mark Asquith:

And, and, and, and you mentioned it that, you know, th th there is no weekend warriors that do well, there aren't any, I once wrote a song called weekend warrior about my brother, cause he's like this.

Mark Asquith:

I might revisit that actually.

Mark Asquith:

it was, it was an interesting time actually.

Mark Asquith:

Yeah, that's, that's, yeah, that's, that's something I've digressed into.

Mark Asquith:

but you've got to understand what, what that success means, and it's the small things that matter.

Mark Asquith:

And number three, it's patients, you know, you ha when we're building software and we're building Captivate and everything else that we do, you know, in my head, I've got this

Mark Asquith:

You know, people, people beat up on you because it's easier to beat up on you than to trust you.

Mark Asquith:

So just.

Mark Asquith:

Be clear on having your vision and be clear on understanding that it's a long term endeavor.

Mark Asquith:

Anything that is worth doing, as we know, is, is worth doing right and takes time to do it.

Mark Asquith:

But you have to have a vision of what things feel like.

Mark Asquith:

and it's difficult to stick to because people will want to tell you that you shouldn't be doing it, but stick to it and make sure you focus on what you want to feel like, not what you want to have.

Mark Asquith:

That's a really important one.

Vit Muller:

I love that.

Vit Muller:

Think about what success feels for you, how will you get there and have that patience.

Vit Muller:

I love it.

Vit Muller:

Mark.

Vit Muller:

It's been amazing having you on the show today.

Vit Muller:

I appreciate you.

Vit Muller:

Appreciate your time taken away from running all your businesses.

Vit Muller:

guys, I appreciate you listening to the show today.

Vit Muller:

Mark.

Vit Muller:

How can people find you if they want to get in touch?

Vit Muller:

If they want to check out your stuff, obviously we're going to put we're going to put some stuff in the show notes for those guys who are interested in podcasting, I've got a special offer for you.

Vit Muller:

All that.

Vit Muller:

I've been able to negotiate with Mark, you get a seven day free trial for Captivate, so there'll be a link there, but other than that, how can people reach out to you, Mark?

Mark Asquith:

Well, thanks for having me on the show, dude, always a pleasure to chat and just probably Twitter at Mr.

Mark Asquith:

Asquith is the easiest way.

Mark Asquith:

Just get me over on the Twitter.

Mark Asquith:

that's where I do most of my engaging and chatting.

Mark Asquith:

So yeah, at Mr.

Mark Asquith:

Asquith on Twitter.

About the Podcast

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Success Inspired
Business and personal development oriented Podcast that can help you accomplish more in life and realise your true potential.

About your host

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Vit Muller

Hi my name is Vit Muller, I'm a dynamic, innovative and results-oriented management professional with expertise in the fitness industry. Specialty skills include facilities management, member acquisition and retention, marketing and sales incorporating a strong growth mindset

I regularly meet fitness business owners who are struggling with the juggling act of keeping their businesses operational and are unable to grow it successfully and fast enough to live the life they deserve. Instead of looking at the bigger picture and developing their business strategically and with the right systems in place, they are often the operators within, the ones who provide end services for their members. As a result they are tired overworked and can't seem to get the ends meet.

I have a proven experience in launching new fitness facilities and re-designing existing businesses. Including business process design and the implementation of effective business systems, sales funnels, automation processes and standard operating procedures.